News

This section includes scientific and technological news from the IAC and its Observatories, as well as press releases on scientific and technological results, astronomical events, educational projects, outreach activities and institutional events.

  • We present a detailed study of the gas chemical abundances in planetary nebulae (PNe), the final fate of solar-like stars, through high spatial resolution Integral Field Unit spectroscopy (IFU) obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) attached to the 8.2-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. We focused on three PNe with high abundance discrepancy factors (ADF > 20), which is a well-known and major unresolved problem in nebular astrophysics: chemical abundances obtained from faint optical recombination lines (ORL) yield systematically larger values than those obtained from

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  • The Unit of Communication and Scientific Culture (UC3) of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) in collaboration with the Museum of Science and the Cosmos (Museums of Tenerife) has edited an astronomical wall calendar, with astronomical ephemerides for the year 2022, which can be consulted and downloaded in digital form and can be obtained in physical form at the IAC Headquarters in La Laguna. The 12 astronomical images which illustrate it have been obtained by astrophotographer Daniel López (The Canary Sky) and the astrophysicists Alfred Rosenberg (IAC), Oswaldo González (MCC

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  • An international study, with the participation of researchers from the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC or Grantecan) affiliated to the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has discovered a first-of-its-kind exploding star, thought to have existed only in theory. The findings are being published today in Nature. In the not-so-distant past, the discovery of a supernova – an exploding star – was considered a rare occasion. Today, advanced measuring instruments and analysis methods make it possible to detect fifty such explosions on a daily basis, which has also increased the probability

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  • Just as archaeology examines the ground with great care to find valuable objects which helps us to get to know ancient civilizations, astronomers look at the stars in the Milky Way in the hope of finding clues to help us understand the earliest period of development of our Galaxy. A team of researchers, in which the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias participates, publishes today in Nature the discovery of the oldest globular cluster remnant discovered to date. This study combines data from ESA's GAIA satellite with observations made at the Gran Telescopio Canarias, installed at the Roque

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  • La madrugada del 4 de enero el proyecto europeo Interreg EELabs retransmitirá la lluvia de meteoros de las Cuadrántidas desde el Observatorio del Teide, del Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, a través del canal sky-live.tv. Las Gemínidas y las Cuadrántidas son, junto a las Perseidas, las lluvias de meteoros más intensas del año, con una actividad que roza los 100 meteoros por hora (ZHR, tasas horarias cenitales) y que se mantiene constante año tras año (actividad cuadrántidas año 2021 en IMO). La noche del 3 al 4 de enero, además, será un momento óptimo para la observación de esta lluvia

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  • In the current cosmological model, galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way, by merging with each other. These mergers can lead to kinematic anomalies that can be used to shed light onto the formation history of the galaxy. However, it is important to be able to distinguish whether these anomalies are an unambiguous signal of a past merger or if they can originate from different processes. One of these kinematic anomalies is prolate rotation. A galaxy shows prolate rotation if it rotates around its major axis. This kinematic characteristic is relatively frequent in massive galaxies and it

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